ARTECHOUSE Comes to Las Vegas at Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art

The new exhibit is available to view through April 18, 2022.

Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art

While may might be unfamiliar, the Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art is a well-kept secret for art lovers in Las Vegas. Hidden in plain sight, the gallery has hosted pieces from world-renowned artists such as Andy Warhol and Yayoi Kusama. 

"Ase: Afro Frequencies," presented by ARTECHOUSE

Last week, the gallery introduced a brand new exhibit, "Ase: Afro Frequencies," presented by ARTECHOUSE with artist Vince Fraser and poet Ursula Rucker. The space is fully immersive and takes viewers on a journey through West African tradition and Black culture. We visited the gallery for a media preview and talked with Tarissa Tiberti, the Executive Director of Arts & Culture for MGM Resorts, to get a little insight into the new exhibit, which will be on view until April 18, 2022. 

"Ase: Afro Frequencies" at Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art Las Vegas | WhereTraveler
"Ase: Afro Frequencies" at Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art (©Melanie Lee)

"We really like Artechouse and what they're doing in digital and interactive art," Tiberti explained. "I've seen a couple of their exhibits—they have shows in Washington D.C., Miami and New York. I just think that their exhibits and how they're doing them are very in the now. It was the opportunity to work with them, and they had this exhibit available. I think it's also very fitting in the context of what our company's mission is and in terms of the art program as well with diversity and inclusion, and it was kind of a match made in heaven." 

Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art Hosts "Ase: Afro Frequencies" Las Vegas | WhereTraveler
Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art Hosts "Ase: Afro Frequencies"

While this isn't the first immersive exhibit at Bellagio Gallery of Fine Arts, it's certainly the most extensive. "The last major immersive exhibit we've done was the Yayoi Kusama," Tiberti explained. "That was awesome and went over really great, and it was amazing to see how many people came to see it. I was shocked but not shocked because I think people knew about it, but it wasn't so mainstream. I think the same thing will happen here because it's that kind of experience people are looking for, even if they don't necessarily know about the artist and the content. That way, they come away learning something new, which is always exciting. I think it's also taking a step further than Kusama because Kusama was one piece, and this is almost the whole space becoming one big immersion with all the little pieces combined."